Photo of Azim ChowdhuryPhoto of Galen D. Rende

As we have previously reported, on December 27, 2020, Congress amended the Prevent All Cigarette Trafficking (PACT) Act to apply to e-cigarettes and all vaping products (referred to in the legislation collectively as “Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems” or “ENDS”).  Under the amended PACT Act, these products are subject to the same federal and state

Reposted from Keller and Heckman’s Blog, The Daily Intake

  • On January 15, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warning lettersto ten companies that sell electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) products, including e-liquids.  FDA’s letters warned that any new tobacco product not in compliance with the premarket authorization requirements of the Federal

Photo of Sheila A. MillarPhoto of Azim Chowdhury

In March of this year, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced that it would interpret the Child Nicotine Poisoning Prevention Act of 2015 (CNPPA) as mandating specific flow-restrictor requirements for liquid nicotine containers that are sold, offered for sale, manufactured for sale, or distributed in commerce. CPSC soon began aggressive enforcement of its new

Photo of Azim ChowdhuryPhoto of Sheila A. Millar

As previously reported on this blog, earlier this year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced that it was now reading the Child Nicotine Poisoning Prevention Act (CNPPA) to require nicotine e-liquid bottles to meet the “restricted flow requirement” in 16 C.F.R. § 1700.15(d), in addition to having child-resistant closures. A wave of enforcement

Photo of Azim ChowdhuryPhoto of Sheila A. Millar

Since the Child Nicotine Poison Prevention Act (CNPPA) became law in 2015, liquid nicotine in containers “from which nicotine is accessible through normal and foreseeable use by a consumer” (such as e-liquid bottles) have been required to utilize child-resistant packaging pursuant to the Poison Packaging Prevention Act (PPPA) and its implementing